Sunday, 7 February 2016

A Century of Style Exhibition at Kelvingrove

Back in Glasgow for the weekend, Sprogzilla and I decided at visit "A Century of Style - Costume and Colour 1800-1899" which is on at Kelvingrove Museum until the 14th Feb. All the clothes were chosen from the Museum's collection of European fashion with emphasis on clothing from Glasgow departments stores and some gorgeous Paris gowns


I had wanted to go to this as I had heard it was fantastic and wasn't disappointed. There was some stunning exhibits. Unfortunately both my DSLR and my phone really struggled to cope with the extremely low lighting so apologies in advance for the fuzzy photos. 



Anyway,  take your glasses off, screw up your eyes and join me in taking a blurry look at some of the fancy frocks.







All the exhibits were grouped by colour and  I have to say that some of the dresses looked really vibrant and fresh. Maybe if I stay in the dark I will look as good as them at 100+.




There was lots of interesting information about the dyes used and how the use of synthetic dyes allowed using previously expensive colours like purple and red to be available to the working classes.





I loved the attention to detail and tone-on-tone embellishments They weren't shy with a ruffle or two especially on the bridal wear.





Mentioning the Better Pictures Project after you have seen this sorry lot might seem a little silly but I had a go with Adobe Lightroom to try to redeem all the dark shots. Just worked out how to change the white balance on the last photo! Typical.

Anyway after too many dodgy photos I am going out with The King who is alive and well and performing in Kelvingrove.


MOR has left the building.

Sending you lovely lot best wishes. 

K xx

24 comments:

  1. I enjoyed your photos, thank you very much. The bridal ensemble is stunning.

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    1. Hi Johanna, isn't it just? There were so many lovely gowns there, even the day dresses were lovely. Might have been a bit much to wear though with all the frou-frou. :) Xx

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  2. Wowser! Ooooh the pretties, the pretties... I'm of a mind to try something like the overlaid organza/voile/net poof on the upper sleeve. [Black lace on shot taffeta? Mmmmmm] The military jackets are lush, and I want military trim on my riding jacket, so, duly noted. LOVE the black and purple of course. THose ribbon rosettes on the shoes are a mathematical delight, but probably to exacting for my slapdash ways. THanks for this, a lovely feast for the eyes.

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    1. One of the wedding dresses made me think of your lilac skirt as it had very similar pleated trim on the bottom. I think that you would have loved this exhibition. There was a lot that I didn't get good photos of and I think that you would have liked. Lots of bustled gowns and a nice example of a crinoline cage in a scandalous scarlet. Some nice green gowns and some amazing mourning gowns too with all over black sparkly beading. Must have been designed by the Victorian version of Bob Mackie. Xx

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  3. Exceptional. Thank you for sharing these
    baci Sally x
    sarsaparillasal.blogspot.com

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    1. Thanks, Sally. It was pleasure. I just wished that more of my pics had been in focus. I have lots of nicely coloured blurs. :) Xx

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  4. Thanks for a great review. I think there is loads of inspiration here.

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    1. Hi Fabrikated, Thanks for your comments. There is indeed. I am in love with that blue jacket with all the detail on the front and it has got me pondering how easy it would be to recreate it. The fabrics and colours were lovely and while some of the styles are a bit too dated there was really a lot that would translate into modern clothing easily. Xx

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  5. Ooh, I went to that art gallery on my one and only trip to Glasgow - I've also got a pic of Elvis somewhere in my dusty box of old photos!
    What a fantastic exhibition. I love the astonishing level of detail, the amazing workmanship, the colours, the shapes - so beautiful. The pinks and purples are exquisite, and I want to stroke that plush red velvet! xxx

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    1. It was brilliant! I am not a huge fan of all the fussy huge crinoline shapes (does my bustle look big in this?) but I loved all the details on the sleeves, the use of trimmings and the tiny buttons. It was so amazing that a lot of those dresses would have been sewn completely by hand. The work for the poor seamstresses, and all that work to keep them looking clean and presentable for all the servants. They must have been very heavy to wear too. My absolute favourite was that red velvet dress, so opulent. I think I would make an exception for that one. :) Xx

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  6. Absolutely stunning! The colours are beautiful and the detail is eye watering. Nevertheless, I'm so glad that crinolines and bustles haven't returned on the fashion cycle.....we'd have to redesign all our living space if they did; the door ways aren't wide enough!

    xxx

    Veronica
    vronni60s.blogspot.com

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    1. Hi Veronica, me too. I was having that very conversation with a wonderful little old lady in front of the wedding dresses. Imagine how much washing that would have been, and without a washing machine to do it too. Apparently lots of ladies were burnt to death from their crinolines getting too close to the fire. It must have been so restrictive in doing many different activities too. Xx

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  7. Such amazing garments -with what must of been a ton of hand sewing. The colours are amazing too (I especially like the very first one.) Thank you for the peek!

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    1. My pleasure, Sox. It was such a nice exhibition and that dress was definitely one of the highlights. The brocade was stunning. I think that the costume museum has closed down in Scotland so it is a rare treat to so so many garments from their collection, in the flesh. Just makes you wonder about all the treasures that never see the light of day. Xx

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  8. Wonderful photos from what looked like a brilliant exhibition. The first dress and the fourth are my favourites, there's a distinctly Indian feel to that print.
    I adore vintage militaria. The detailing on the sleeve of the Police uniform is gorgeous. xxx

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    1. Hi Vix, yes, both those dresses were lovely. The colours were so rich and such a lovely shade. Although you can only see a tiny bit of it there was a Paisley pattern shawl on the wall behind the dress. Both were woven just south of Glasgow in Paisley where all the mills were that wove this type of fabric and gave it it's name. Paisley has some lovely old buildings that used to be textile factories but I don't think that there are any working ones left. It is such shame. I imagine that it would have given Leeds or Bradford a run for their money back in the day. :) Xx

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  9. Wow what an amazing looking exhibition! I love that the exhibits were categorised by colour. That's the kind of thing that drives me insane in a charity shop but I bet was fantastic in this setting! xxx

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    1. Hi Zoe, yes it was fab seeing all the colours together. I really liked that they also gave quite a bit of information about the dyes used for the fabrics and how some colours were so expensive to produce that only the wealthy could wear them - Black being a real status symbol. Who knew? I really learnt a lot as well as it being eye candy. P.S. I used to arrange my CDs alphabetically , then chronologically by band so I agree about the colour thing. Colours AND numbers would be okay but it is so annoying otherwise. :) Xx

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  10. Those are stunning. Were most of the purple ones mourning clothes, or did people wear purple for simple pleasure too? The ladies of Glasgow must have been a very stylish bunch.

    What's the aperture on your SLR lens? And what did you push the ISO to? I know different cameras' capabilities vary; my Fuji compact struggles in low light, though it's gorgeous in bright conditions, whereas my husband's fancy SLR can almost take photos in the dark!

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    1. Hi Mim, no, I think that the purple was just for everyday fashion. They had some fabulous black mourning clothes that were very fancy indeed. Lots of beads and a bit glam. Photographing them was hard. I tried setting the iso higher and bracketing my shots but it was seriously dark in there, presumably to save the fabrics fading and certainly no good for hand-held shooting.think that they would;d have had a flakey if I had brought a tripod. My phone did better. it takes great shots normally. : ) Xx

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  11. The red velvet dress! The soutache trim on that coat sleeve! I am dying of swoon over here. Thanks so much for sharing, MoR! What a truly gorgeous exhibit.

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    1. Hi Mary, yes it was lovely. I think that you would have really liked it in the flesh. The dresses were all lovely and packed with loads of amazing details. I would have liked to go back but it shuts tomorrow and I am at work. Boo hiss. Xx

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  12. I think it is such a shame that things that are created now are lacking in the little details and imagination that used to be present both in garments and in architecture. I know it is a cost thing for RTW. For the home sewer most people do not have the skills and those that do will often look out of place for putting those details into their clothing. I'm really often tempted to anyway and posts like this make me want to make myself something really intricate to wear.

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    1. I know doesn't it just. The detail in these garments was astonishing and mostly made of fabrics, either the same as the dress or toning. I loved all the detail. I think that every home sewer should make at least one really challenging thing in their lives. :) I am toying with cloning the blue jacket. What sort of intricate thing would you make? Xx

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